Open Network – Sensors and Wearables

The Open Network event took place on 16 March 2017, from 10:00 to 12:30, at the University of Warwick’s International Digital Laboratory. The event discussed how sensors and wearable technology can help people maintain their health, care and wellbeing.

mark-elliott

Dr Mark Elliott, PhD MEng MIET

Assistant Professor of Healthcare Technology & Behaviour Change
Institute of Digital Healthcare, WMG, University of Warwick
 

Talk title and abstract

The potential impact of low-cost sensors and wearables on healthcare

 

Objective measures of physical and mental states of individuals can add detailed information about a patient’s health alongside current subjective clinical assessments and patient reported outcomes. Recently the technology has matured such that these objective measures can be provided by relatively low-cost sensors, often worn on the body or built into assistive and medical devices. Data from these devices can be used to provide feedback to the patient, increasing opportunities for health self-management outside of the clinical environment, as well providing important longitudinal data to clinicians. In this talk, I will provide some examples of the research taking place within the Institute of Digital Healthcare where low-cost movement and activity monitoring sensors in particular have the potential to impact healthcare in several areas. These include physiotherapy self-management, pre/post clinical assessment and behaviour change. As well as the opportunities, I will further discuss some of the challenges we face in translating the technologies from a research lab environment into the NHS and other healthcare environments.

 

Biography

Mark is Assistant Professor of Healthcare Technology and Behaviour Change at the Institute of Digital Healthcare. Mark’s main research interests are centred on human movement coordination and the use of technology for rehabilitation of movement. The applications of Mark’s research cover a broad range of subjects in digital healthcare, including:

 

  • Technology to promote self-management of rehabilitation and physiotherapy.
  • Clinical evaluation.
  • Intelligent healthcare systems.

 

Prior to his current position, Mark was a Research Fellow in the Sensory Motor Neuroscience (SyMoN) lab at the University of Birmingham. He completed his PhD at Aston University, developing intelligent systems to discriminate between different walking patterns. Before completing his PhD, Mark qualified with an MEng in Electronic Systems Engineering (Aston University) and worked for 3 years as a Design Engineer in the telecommunications industry.
 

Tel: +44 (0)2476 15 16 04
Email: m.t.elliott@warwick.ac.uk
Twitter: @dr_mte
Web: http://go.warwick.ac.uk/markelliott
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marktelliott

vadim-melnicuk

Vadim Melnicuk, BEng MIET

EngD (International) candidate
WMG, Experiential Engineering Research Group, University of Warwick

 

Talk title and abstract

Use of physiological responses, captured by consumer grade electronics, for objective evaluation of drivers’ state

 

This session aims to demonstrate the use of human physiological responses, captured by consumer grade electronic devices, for objective evaluation of drivers’ state, or as it commonly referred to, Driver State Monitoring (DSM). Despite the novelty of this research area, it was forecasted that a DSM system might become a standard passenger car feature by 2025. Such system will equip future vehicles with ability to estimate driver state constructs such as distraction, workload, and fatigue. This could help to minimise human error occurrences on roads by keeping those constructs at optimal threshold. Therefore, the numerous attempts, both in academia and industry, were made to objectify driver state by linking it to physiological indicators including, heart rate and skin sweatiness; these can be measured using various sensors and wearable devices attached to human body or embedded into a vehicle. This talk, however, specifically focuses on the use of consumer grade sensors and wearables including, devices such as, smartwatches and fitness bands. The data from two driving simulator user trials will be presented to demonstrate how these devices were used to estimate level of workload in real-time while driving under distinctive task complexities. For instance, heart rate, captured using Empatica E4, BASIS Peak Smartwatch, and Polar H7 Heart Monitor, has revealed some patterns that can be related to workload. For instance, Heart Rate Variability (HRV) was significantly affected by variations in driving workload e.g., the highest HRV was measured during the lowest complexity driving, and vice versa. Additionally, electrodermal activity, peripheral body temperature, and various emotions were captured and analysed. To conclude, the benefits and current limitations of consumer grade electronics in DSM will be discussed. For instance, an ability to evaluate humans’ state prior to actual driving activities can be beneficial; it may enable adaptation of safety and in-vehicle information systems to drivers’ state and as a result counteract fatigue or increased level of workload as early as possible. On the other hand, there are numerous technological and human factors implications that need to be considered when developing a DSM system, ranging from hardware limitations to potentially low user acceptance.

 

Biography

Vadim is an engineer, technologist, and doctorate candidate at WMG, University of Warwick, with interest in connected cars and intelligent vehicle technologies. His research focuses on integration of consumer grade electronic devices into a passenger vehicle for the purpose of driver state monitoring, both from technological and human factors perspective. Vadim has graduated with first-class honours in BEng Electronic Engineering from Birmingham City University and is a current member of IET, IEEE, and ITS UK.

 

Tel: +44 (0)2476 52 80 28
Email: v.melnicuk@warwick.ac.uk
Twitter: @vadimmelnicuk
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vadimmelnicuk

 

rich-westman
Kaido_Blue

Rich Westman

Chief Executive Officer
Kaido
 

Talk title and abstract

Making self monitoring devices more useful

 

Healthcare systems worldwide are under increasing pressure: To reduce costs whilst improving the quality of patient care and also empower patients to better manage their health away from hospitals and GP surgeries. Technology is widely seen as a facilitator for achieving these conflicting objectives, yet we are still to see any significant progress in terms of proving its benefit to patients.

 

We are living in a data revolution. A growing population of smartphone and tablet users, improved connectivity and availability of healthcare bio-sensors and wearables are giving both patient and clinician access to real- time healthcare data and information that has never before been possible. The average person now generates nearly 1200TB of health data in their lifetime, giving an unprecedented opportunity to understand health behaviour, disease progression and create more personalised and preventative models of care.

 

60% of this data is attributed to exogenous factors such as lifestyle choice. With 57.8% of all Long-Term conditions, the largest cost to healthcare systems, attributed to poor lifestyle choice, healthcare data provides a unique opportunity for clinicians to intervene earlier in the care pathway and support the prevention agenda. However, data is only as useful as the insights that can be derived from it. As has been proven by current Wearable manufacturers such as Fitbit. Passing data in its raw form to an uneducated individual is not enough to promote long term behavioural change. Advances in data analytics such as Artificial Intelligence have created an ability to analyse and assess the interaction between multiple sets of data, but there is still a need for this data to be analysed in context and combined with professional health expertise to make it useful.

 

The NHS in the UK has identified that it’s patient data is an important asset for a number of years. But selling the data to third parties for commercial use is not the answer, nor does it give confidence to patients that sharing their data is going to lead to improvements in the standard of their care. Putting the patient at the centre of their individual health eco-system and in control of how they use their data is massively important. So too, is proving how sharing their data will not only empower them as patients but also support new medical research, care pathways and the wider health economy.

 

Rich will explore how data can be combined with professional expertise to empower clinicians and patients to influence patient behaviour, and sustain engagement outside of the traditional care settings. Rich will also introduce Intelligent Health Assistants as a novel method of engaging with patients, utilising the most active patient community in the world: Facebook!

 

Biography

Rich Westman, is the CEO and Founder of Kaido Group Ltd a pioneering health tech start up in Birmingham. Before founding Kaido, Rich was Academy Strength and Conditioning Coach at Worcester Warriors and before that Leicester Tigers RFC. Rich has a degree in sports science and business studies from Loughborough University and before that played professional tennis. Kaido Group Ltd is founded by a team of clinical and health practitioners passionate about sharing their knowledge to benefit public health. Recent advancements in technology provide a fantastic opportunity to do this at scale and create more personalised models in healthcare.

 

Tel: +44 (0)1212 50 57 95
Email: rich.westman@kaido.co.uk
Twitter: @kaido_group @kaidowellbeing
Web: www.kaido.co.uk

10:00

Welcome

10:05

Mark Elliott

The potential impact of low-cost sensors and wearables on healthcare

10:35

Refreshments

10:50

Vadim Melnicuk

Use of physiological responses, captured by consumer grade electronics, for objective evaluation of drivers’ state

11:20

Rich Westman

Making self-monitoring devices more useful

11:50

Closing comments, lunch and networking

Mark Elliott

The potential impact of low-cost sensors and wearables on healthcare

Download the presentation

 

Vadim Melnicuk

Use of physiological responses, captured by consumer grade electronics, for objective evaluation of drivers’ state

Download the presentation

 

Rich Westman

Making self-monitoring devices more useful

Download the presentation



Posted on by Martin Rowland

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The West Midlands Health Informatics Network is hosted by the Institute of Digital Healthcare (IDH) at University of Warwick.